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EOS M6: A Highly Functional Mirrorless Camera with a Classic Design

Canon has released the EOS M6 mirrorless camera, which is getting attention for its classic, stylish design, while enabling you to enjoy full-fledged photography. In this article, we take a look at the key features of the camera’s classic exterior. (Reported by: Sayaka Suzuki)

 

1. Design

Available in both black and silver, the body of the EOS M6 has a vintage-style design, with a solid structure and sleek lines that exude masculinity, as well as a classic charm and smooth curves that evokes a softness and a sense of femininity, resulting in unique charm.

Furthermore, the exterior alone has had some fun ideas implemented, such as the stacked dial, the lightweight 343g body, as well as tilt-type LCD monitor. The camera is also equipped with a pop-up flash, which allows for an even wider range of photos to be taken.

EOS M6

 

EOS M6 viewed from different angles
EOS M6 viewed from different angles
 

 

EOS M6 viewed from different angles
EOS M6 viewed from different angles
 

 

EOS M6 viewed from different angles
EOS M6 viewed from different angles
 

 

2. Buttons

The dials located on the top right of the body are the Mode Dial, Main Dial, Exposure Compensation Dial, with the Quick Control Dial lying underneath them. The buttons are arranged with usability in mind, so you can make adjustments to the settings without having to move your fingers much. Additionally, though it is a fine detail, the lever-type power button makes turning the camera on and off a breeze.

EOS M6 top panel, EOS M6 rear control panel

As I often photograph manually, the compactness of the operating parts caught my attention. It looks as if once you get used to it, you will be able to quickly perform operations and have fun shooting.

Although the body is compact, the camera has a large LCD monitor, while the button arrangement on the rear side is the same as that on the EOS M5. However, I get the impression that the buttons are slightly smaller on the EOS M6.

 

3. External viewfinder

An improved external viewfinder, the EVF-DC2 that is 29g lighter than its predecessor is available (sold separately). Fans who like the compact size of a mirrorless camera but who also like to shoot using a viewfinder will find this a welcome addition to their photographic arsenal.

EOS M6 with external EVF (close-up)

With the approximately 2.36 million-dot OLED panel, you can see right down to the fine details of your subject. Particularly in environments with strong lighting, it can be hard to view the screen when you are shooting using only the LCD monitor, so this item couldn’t have come at a better time to eliminate such a concern.

EOS M6 with external EVF

 

4. LCD monitor

The LCD monitor is a 3.0-inch, 1.04 million-dot tilt-type screen. It supports a variety of shooting postures, with a movement range of 180 degrees in the upward direction and 45 degrees in the downward direction. Thanks to the lightweight body, you can enjoy shooting selfies with one hand.

EOS M6 with tilting screen

 

5. Memory media and battery

The battery pack used on the EOS M6 is the LP-E17, which for allows for a total number of 295 shots to be taken. The camera also supports SDXC/SDHC/SD memory cards, which are UHS-I compatible.

EOS M6 memory card slot

Even though I have handled all of the EOS M-series cameras to date, the EOS M6 stands out compared to its predecessors, due in part to its impressive level of sophistication. With the arrival of the EOS M6, I’m sure I’m not the only one who can't help but feel that Canon's mirrorless cameras have progressed even further.

 

Also check out:
 5 Key Features of the EOS M6

For more articles on the EOS M6, head to:
In Focus: EOS M6

 

Digital Camera Watch

Delivers daily news related to topics such as digital cameras and peripheral devices, and imaging software. Also publishes articles such as reviews on the use of actual digital camera models and photo samples taken using new models.

http://dc.watch.impress.co.jp/

Sayaka Suzuki

After graduating from the Department of Design in the Tokyo University of Art and Design, Suzuki started work at a video production company. She also apprenticed under the producer Tan Hakata. After learning about video production and editing, she was an apprentice to the photographer Shin Yamagishi, and then went independent in February 2012. Currently, besides photo-magazines, she has expanded her range of activities to include mainly CD jackets, advertising photos, and video photography, etc.

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