Tips & Tutorials

[Part 2] Capture the cuteness and give your photo a fresh look!

[Part 2] of this series article, "Taking cute pictures of children" will show you how to effectively frame and compose shots to catch that precious moment of your child. Let's dive further into the know-hows on "capturing that ‘child-like' moment," "producing pictures with impact," "composition," "brightness," and "bokeh" for complete beginners and entry-level users of digital SLR. With the use of photos, professional photographer, Yuji Ogura will give tips on how to take cute pictures. (Written & Organized by: Camera Biyori Editorial Department)

A seven-month-old boy. We drew his attention by getting him to "look this way".

Capturing the Cuteness Adds Impact to Your Photo

Plump little hands and feet, soft skin – The cuteness of a young can be captured more impressively by focusing only on a specific part.

A shot of the little hands and feet – The bed sheets in the background are softly blurred.

Useful Tips!

Camera Setting: AUTO Mode

In the "AUTO" mode, the camera analyzes the conditions of the scene during a shoot, and selects the most appropriate settings to take the picture. Select the icon marked as "Auto" on the Mode Dial or menu screen. As you only need to press the shutter to take a shot, you can focus fully on seizing the photo opportunities.

Photo-taking Tip
Understanding the closest focusing distance!

To blur the background, take a shot closer to your subject. Take a look at the "closest focusing distance" stated in the specifications of your "interchangeable lens." This refers to the closest distance at which the camera is able to establish focus on the subject. The focusing distance is measured from the focal plane mark on top of the body to the subject being photographed.

Changing the Composition to Give Your Photos a Fresh Look

Placing the subject at the center of the photo or slightly off to one side gives the viewer a different impression. Try taking different shots of the same scene and find the one with the best balance.

Taken during a chase through a clay pipe at the playground. I composed a shot with the subject placed right at the center.

In this composition, I placed the subject a little to the right. The length of the pipe is highlighted as well.

Useful Tips!

Camera Setting: AUTO Mode

In the "AUTO" mode, the camera analyzes the conditions of the scene during a shoot, and selects the most appropriate settings to take the picture. Select the icon marked as "Auto" on the Mode Dial or menu screen. As you only need to press the shutter to take a shot, you can focus fully on seizing the photo opportunities.

Photo-taking Tip 1

Placing the child at the center

By placing the main subject at the center, "what you are trying to show" can be clearly expressed and understood. Also, being a simple composition, it is effective when you want to emphasize the form (e.g. pose) of the subject.

Photo-taking Tip 2

Creating blank spaces

Move the subject slightly off the center and create a blank space across from it, and an ordinary photo will be transformed into something refreshing. Blank spaces create an expanse in photos, and also have the effect of guiding the line of vision of the viewer.

Rings a bell?

Common challenges and failures in taking child photos

Q1: Shadows of the hat brim on the child's face.

A: When taking photos outdoors on a sunny day, one of the likely problems is the shadow of the hat that will be cast on the child's face.  You can avoid such situations by adjusting the hat and moving it to the side when taking a picture.

Q2: The photos turned out dark.

A: Having photos turn our darker than we want it is another common issue. You can avoid this by increasing the amount of "exposure compensation'. This way, the brightness of your photos will be enhanced.

Q3: Where should the focus be placed when taking pictures of the face?

A: When taking pictures of children's faces, focus on their eyes. If not, the photo may give a vague or fuzzy impression.

Camera and Lenses Used

EOS 100D & EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM (35mm format equivalent: approx. 29-88mm)

Click here for detailed specification

The latest model in the EOS three-digit series, which is popular for shared use among family members. The ultra-compact body that fits comfortably in the hand is amazingly light, weighing about 370g. Perfectly suited for taking child photos, it is a model that you cannot part with even for a moment.

* This article is created based on a trial model. Aspects such as the appearance and image quality may differ slightly from the actual product.

To learn more of our shooting tips, come see our website and also the latest issue of the "Camera Biyori" magazine.

Yuji Ogura

Ogura's work in photography expands from shooting photographic works to development and printing films. He is one of the tutors at the "Camera Biyori Photography School". He started his career as an engineer at a film laboratory and later establishes his own "mogu camera" lab. He also runs the "mogu sun" portrait studio.

Camera Biyori

Camera Biyori is a Japanese photography magazine introducing charming photos and daily joy with cameras. Suggesting fun activities relating to cameras and photography, Camera Biyori editorial department also offer the "Camera Biyori Photography School" to recommend its readers to engage in photography and have fun.

http://www.camerabiyori.com

Published by Daiichi Progress Inc.

comments

Write a Comment

 

Login to comment

Win an EOS M100

You have been logged off from your account.

An email with an activation link had been sent to your SNAPSHOT registered email.

After clicking the link, you will be able to login with your existing login detail.

Thank you for your continued support as a member of the CANON and SNAPSHOT Community. We will do our best to continue provide you with more exciting and meaningful content to help you in your everyday quest to bring out the best photographer within you!

Permission to continue

Your CANON ID will be MERGED with your SNAPSHOT ID.

An activation link will be sent to your email.

Please re-enter your password to give us permission to continue.

Type your password

By clicking this, you agree to merge your CANON ID to SNAPSHOT ID. Agreeing to this is subject to CANON AND SNAPSHOT’S TERMS & CONDITIONS.