Products

[Part 2] Test Shoot: How Well Are Details Expressed with 50.6 Megapixels?

How powerful is the EOS 5DS’s 50.6-megapixel resolution really when it comes to capturing details? This series of articles aim to test the capabilities of the EOS 5DS through simulation of advertisement photo shoots. Here, in this second article, we look at still-life shots produced by the camera to see how well its detail-depiction capability lives up to the hype over its 50.6-megapixel ultra-high resolution. (Edited by: COMMERCIAL PHOTO)

"Fine Detail" - New Picture Style that brings out the 50.6-megapixel apparent resolution

When using the EOS 5DS, you need to pay careful attention to the focus. While it might resemble a 35mm DSLR camera in its external appearance, it is best to use it with the same degree of care and caution that you would use on a 4×5 large-format camera, where focus used to be established by looking through a magnifying glass at the viewfinder image. If you have ample time for the shoot and a PC monitor with the necessary system requirements, you are recommended to take Live View shots through a PC. This test was conducted prior to the release of the EOS 5DS. The model was not yet supported on EOS Utility, so I was unable to view the images on a PC monitor. Nonetheless, I was still able to enlarge the Live View image up to 16 times on the EOS 5DS's LCD monitor. Thanks to this, and also to the high focusing accuracy of the magnified display on Canon cameras, I was able to establish the focus precisely.

EOS 5DS/ EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM/ Manual (f/11, 0.8 sec.)/ ISO 100/ WB: 5300K/ Picture Style: Fine Detail  (Photos by: Akihiko Nagumo Styling by: Futoshi Watanabe & Toshiya Suzuki (Book inc.))

This is not a resolution test using objects such as fine particles and fibre. Rather, the key point here is to see how the camera portrays the texture of objects and the atmosphere. What characterises the ultra-high pixel count is that the image produced is so real it's as if you could feel the powdery and grainy texture when you touch it with your hands.

[Fine Detail]

The resolving power of the 50-megapixel class is more evident with the "Fine Detail" Picture Style, which fares better in gradation reproduction and the fine depiction of outlines compared to the "Standard" effect.

[Standard]

While there is enough contrast and outline is also sharp, the details are lost in some parts of the image if we look closely enough.

For tiny objects such as those in the example above, the resolution will be compromised if we do not pay careful attention when applying the "Sharpness" effect. Two new parameters for "Fineness" and "Threshold", have been added to the Sharpness setting in the EOS 5DS's Picture Style options, enabling you to adjust the sharpness in detail. Also, the new "Fine Detail" Picture Style, which offers a finer outline and a lower contrast compared to the sharpness of the "Standard" effect, is suited for fine depictions.

The "Detailed setting" screen of the "Fine Detail" Picture Style. The smaller the number, the finer the outlines emphasized. Conversely, increasing the number for the "Fineness" parameter under the "Sharpness" item thickens the outlines, which may cause the apparent resolution of the details to deteriorate as a result. To express details, it is therefore advisable to set "Fineness" to a smaller number.

COMMERCIAL PHOTO

A monthly photography magazine for photographers and advertising creatives. It also runs a website named "Shuffle", which offers information on equipment, software, techniques and events for professionals in photography and videography.

http://shuffle.genkosha.com/

Published by GENKOSHA Co., Ltd

comments

Write a Comment

 

Login to comment

Win an EOS M100

You have been logged off from your account.

An email with an activation link had been sent to your SNAPSHOT registered email.

After clicking the link, you will be able to login with your existing login detail.

Thank you for your continued support as a member of the CANON and SNAPSHOT Community. We will do our best to continue provide you with more exciting and meaningful content to help you in your everyday quest to bring out the best photographer within you!

Permission to continue

Your CANON ID will be MERGED with your SNAPSHOT ID.

An activation link will be sent to your email.

Please re-enter your password to give us permission to continue.

Type your password

By clicking this, you agree to merge your CANON ID to SNAPSHOT ID. Agreeing to this is subject to CANON AND SNAPSHOT’S TERMS & CONDITIONS.