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Products >> All Products Reviews and Comparison of EOS R Cameras and RF Lenses- Part

EOS R6 Mark II vs. EOS R8: Which to Choose?

2023-07-28
41
14.37 k

The EOS R6 Mark II and EOS R8 share many similar specifications, such as a 24.2-megapixel full-frame CMOS image sensor, a blazing fast 40 fps maximum continuous shooting speed, and nearly identical video capabilities. Is it worth spending more for the extra features on the EOS R6 Mark II? In this article, we go through the key differences between the two, so you can better decide which camera best suits your needs.

In this article:

 

Recap: What’s the same on the EOS R6 Mark II and EOS R8?

- 24.2-megapixel full-frame CMOS image sensor
- Canon’s RF mount
- Up to 40 fps continuous shooting (electronic shutter mode)
- DIGIC X image processor
- The same AF interface inherited from the EOS R3
- Same AF features, including AF area modes and detectable subjects
- Movie Digital IS with tilt correction

At the same time, these are still two completely different cameras at different price points. These are their main differences. Click on the link to jump to a particular point.

1. Size and weight
2. Image stabilisation
3. Card slots
4. Shutter modes
5. RAW video
6. Battery life
7. Maximum continuous video recording time
8. Sensor-protecting mechanism
9. Viewfinder
10. Other smaller details
11. Table: Summary of differences

 

Difference #1: Size and weight

The EOS R8 is smaller and lighter, but there are good reasons why the EOS R6 Mark II is heavier

At approximately 461g (body only) with batteries and memory media, the EOS R8 is over 200g lighter than the 670g EOS R6 Mark II. Currently Canon’s lightest full-frame mirrorless camera, it is smaller than the EOS R6 Mark II.

Camera Dimensions (W x H x D)
EOS R6 Mark II 138.4 x 98.4 x 88.4mm
EOS R8 133 x 86 x 70mm

You will be able to feel the difference in size and weight. If you have smaller hands, depending on the lens, you might find the EOS R8 easier to hold securely and operate with one hand compared to the EOS R6 Mark II with the same lens.


Know this: Extension Grip EG-E1 for EOS R8

Extension Grip EG-E1, which weighs approximately 86g, extends the EOS R8’s grip by around 15mm. This brings the height of the grip to around 101.1mm, similar to the height of the EOS R6 Mark II’s grip. While this would bring the total weight of the camera to around 547g, that is still lighter than the EOS R6 Mark II.


Consider:

Where portability is concerned, the EOS R8 holds the advantage. However, the EOS R6 Mark II offers extra features that improve convenience, reliability, and shooting experience. These include:

- In-Body IS
- Dual card slots
- Mechanical shutter
- A larger EVF display
- A shutter-down mechanism when the lens is detached.

We will go into more detail about these in the rest of this article.

 

Difference #2: Image stabilisation

The EOS R6 Mark II has In-Body IS. How much of a difference does it make to you?


Still shooting: A huge difference

EOS R6 Mark II In-Body IS In-lens IS Coordinated Control IS
EOS R8
-
In-lens IS
-

The EOS R6 Mark II is equipped with a sensor-shift type in-body image stabilisation mechanism (In-Body IS), which shifts the image sensor to compensate for camera shake along 5 axes. With this, you can enjoy:

  •  Image stabilisation even when using lenses with no Optical IS (in-lens IS)
    Examples: RF50mm f/1.8 STM,  RF50mm f/1.2L USM.
     
  • A boost in image stabilisation effect on compatible lenses with Optical IS through the coordination of the in-camera and in-lens IS systems (Coordinated Control IS). 
    Example: The IS effect on the RF24-105mm f/4L IS USM goes up from 5 stops’ equivalent to 8 on the EOS R6 Mark II

On the EOS R8, you must use a lens with Optical IS to have image stabilisation during still photography.


Video shooting: A narrower gap

EOS R6 Mark II In-Body IS In-lens IS Movie Digital IS + Tilt correction
EOS R8
-
In-lens IS Movie Digital IS + Tilt correction

The EOS R6 Mark II and EOS R8 are both equipped with Movie Digital IS, which digitally performs 5-axis camera shake correction. Both cameras also feature tilt (perspective) correction a feature that corrects the wobbling at the edges of the image that becomes obvious when recording selfies with wide-angle lenses.

However, In-Body IS coordinates with Movie Digital IS and Optical IS to enhance image stabilisation, which might matter to those who frequently shoot video handheld while on the go.

 

Difference #3: Card slots

Dual card slots are important for professional uses

The EOS R6 Mark II’s two SD card slots offer multiple advantages, such as:

- Instant backup in case one memory card fails: Important in situations with no second chances, such as weddings, events, and sports.
- The ability to record stills and videos onto separate cards: Streamlines workflow for hybrid shooters.

The EOS R8 has a single SD card slot that is combined with the battery compartment. If you frequently use a tripod, note that this compartment might be harder to access when using a large tripod plate.

 

Difference #4: Shutter modes

Speed, rolling shutter, and other considerations

The EOS R6 Mark II and the EOS R8 have the same maximum continuous shooting speed: up to 40 fps with the electronic shutter.

However, the electronic shutter might not be ideal in these situations:

- When it's necessary to avoid rolling shutter distortion
- When using a flash
- Shooting with artificial lights (as the anti-flicker mode becomes unavailable)

While the only alternative on the EOS R8 is the electronic first-curtain shutter (EFCS) mode, the EOS R6 Mark II provides an additional option: the traditional mechanical shutter.

In these alternative modes, the EOS R6 Mark II has the faster continuous shooting speed and maximum shutter speed:

  EOS R6 Mark II EOS R8
Mechanical shutter Up to 12 fps N.A
Electronic first-curtain shutter Up to 6 fps
Fastest shutter speed 1/8000 sec 1/4000 sec

Consider:

If you frequently shoot fast-moving subjects and want to avoid rolling shutter distortion, the EOS R6 Mark II will provide better assurance. The fastest maximum shutter speed will also be useful when using large aperture lenses to create bokeh under bright lighting conditions.

 

Difference #5: RAW video output

Extra information, extra possibilities

The EOS R6 Mark II and EOS R8 have very similar video recording modes and features, which include:

- Internal uncropped 4K video oversampled from 6K
- Canon Log 3 and HDR PQ modes
- High Frame Rate 180p recording
- Zebra and false colour display

However, the EOS R6 Mark II supports 6K RAW external recording through HDMI, whereas the EOS R8 does not. Like RAW still image files, RAW video retains more colour information, offering more flexibility in post-production compared to normal MP4 output.

Consider:

Your hardware and post-production workflow. RAW video files are larger and must be processed to show the difference in results.

 

Difference #6: Battery life

EOS R6 Mark II is also compatible with Battery Grip BG-R10

The EOS R6 Mark II uses the higher-capacity LP-E6NH battery, while the EOS R8 uses the LP-E17, which has around half the capacity. The different battery capacities affect the maximum number of shots that you can achieve.  The table below shows the maximum shots possible on a single charge in Smooth mode*:

  EOS R6 Mark II EOS R8
EVF approx. 320 shots approx. 150 shots
Rear monitor approx. 580 shots approx. 290 shots

*At 23 degrees Celsius. Actual number of shots available may vary greatly depending on the shooting environment and conditions.


Battery grip

The EOS R6 Mark II is compatible with the Battery Grip BG-R10, which can be loaded with two batteries to double the available shooting time. It is also ergonomically designed for easier vertical orientation shooting. Meanwhile, the EOS R8 has no compatible battery grip.


Consider:

1. On average, most people don’t take more than 200 shots per day even while travelling.
2. Both cameras support USB-C power supply and charging, so you can just arm yourself with a compatible power bank and USB-C cable.

Tip: For those upgrading or using multiple cameras
If your existing camera uses batteries compatible with the EOS R6 Mark II/ EOS R8, you’ll have readily available spare batteries.

EOS R6 Mark II (LP-E6NH):
EOS R5, EOS R6, EOS R7
Older version LP-E6N (shorter battery life, limited functions): EOS R, EOS 5D Mark IV

EOS R8 (LP-E17)
EOS RP, EOS M6 Mark II, EOS 77D, EOS 850D, EOS 200D II, and many other intermediate EOS DSLR cameras.

 

Difference #7: Maximum continuous video recording time

For projects involving long hours of continuous video recording

In practice, recording at the highest resolutions and frame rates puts more strain on resources due to the amount of data generated, and the camera might stop recording due to overheating restrictions. Canon's tests show the following maximum continuous recording times when battery life is not taken into account:

  EOS R6 Mark II EOS R8
4K 59.94/50.00 fps (uncropped) approx. 40 min approx. 30 min
4K 59.94/50.00 fps (cropped) approx. 50 min No limit
4K 29.97/ 25.00 fps No limit No limit

When battery life and overheating restrictions are not taken into consideration, the EOS R6 Mark II can record up to 6 hours continuously, and the EOS R8 can record up to 2 hours.

 

Difference #8: Sensor-protecting mechanism

The EOS R6 Mark II has a mechanical shutter-down mechanism that protects the image sensor when the lens is detached. This offers added assurance if you frequently change lenses outdoors or in dusty conditions.

 

Difference #9: Viewfinder

For those who frequently use the EVF

The 0.5-inch, 3.69 million-dot EVF on the EOS R6 Mark II is larger than the 0.39-inch, 2.36 million-dot one on the EOS R8.  This provides a better viewing experience, especially with precise focus adjustments.

 

Difference #10: Other smaller details

Buttons and controls

Both cameras have nearly identical top panel button layouts, with the Photo/Video mode switch on the left, the Quick Control Dial integrated with the On/Off switch, and the main dial behind the shutter button. The main differences in controls are on the rear panel, where the EOS R6 Mark II is designed to enable quicker setting changes.

1. Multi-controller
The EOS R6 Mark II has a Multi-controller (“joystick”) that can intuitively move the AF area/point during viewfinder shooting.

2. Quick Control dial vs. cross keys
The EOS R6 Mark II’s rear Quick Control dial lets you quickly cycle through options, whereas the EOS R8 has cross keys instead.


3. The EOS R6 Mark II has a “Depth of field” preview button on its front, similar to EOS DSLR cameras. It can also be assigned other custom functions.

Wi-Fi
If you use Wi-Fi for file transfer from your camera, the 5Ghz compatibility on the EOS R6 Mark II offers a faster transfer option.

 

Table: Summary of key differences

  EOS R6 Mark II EOS R8
Weight
(approx.; body only with cards and battery)
670g 461g
In-Body IS Yes No
Card slots 2 x SD 1 x SD
Battery LP-E6NH (2130 mAh) LP-E17 (1040 mAh)
Shutter modes Mechanical
Electronic first-curtain (EFCS)
Electronic
Electronic first-curtain (EFCS)
Electronic
Max continuous shooting
(excluding electronic shutter mode)
12 fps
(Mechanical, EFCS)
6 fps
(EFCS)
Shutter down to protect the sensor during lens changes Yes No
Viewfinder 0.5-inch
3.69 million dots
0.76x magnification
0.39-inch
2.36 million dots
0.7x magnification
RAW video output 6K 60p (external recording) No
Continuous movie recording (system limit) 6h 2h
Wireless LAN 2.4/5Ghz 2.4 Ghz
Bluetooth version 5.0 4.2

 

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